OT, Skills for the Job of Living

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Welcome,

pottery-and-aunt-helen-025.jpgSometimes parts of yourself become disconnected. Your hopes become separated from your life facts. With compassion and skill, I can tend to disconnection and help loosen what is stuck. We will look, together, at what your hopes and fears are saying.

I have a part-time practice and can be reached via: HakomiOT@gmail.com or (403) 903-7946. Please feel free to introduce yourself to me if you are looking for a therapist. Although I maintain complete confidentiality of your contact emails or phone to me, email itself has inherent limits to its security.

Scroll down to posts for grounding and breath exercises to increase in-the-moment coping. For urgent help: Calgary Distress Centre at 403-266-4357; guide them how to help.

As a Registered Occupational Therapist and Certified Hakomi Therapist, I orient my private practice of psychosocial Occupational Therapy to best fit your mental health needs. My body-focused approach addresses your day to day performance and satisfaction. I invite you to explore my website or, simply call or email.

Please contact me if you are looking for someone to help with the following issues:

  • Difficulty managing stressful situations – life crises
  • Trouble fitting in socially, or struggles with relating to others
  • Out of control emotions, or numbness
  • Anxiety &/or Sadness and depression
  • Suicidal thoughts (with and without attempts or self harm)
  • Issues related to trauma
  • Problems coping or functioning at work
  • Transitions/phase of life issues

Hakomi Calgary  highlights therapists who work in this model. Hakomi Mindfulness-Centred Somatic Psychotherapy comes from “Hakomi” (Ha-ko-mee), a Hopi Indian word meaning “where do I stand in relation to these many realms”.

Content copyright 2012-2019. Kirsten Buhr, M. Sc. (O.T.), C.H.T. All rights reserved.

 

It’s Fall

Here’s a Mary Oliver for the closing of September. (Typing poems – copying anything – sounds pleasant, rhythmic; more satisfying than cutting and pasting)

Freshen the Flowers, She Said

So I put them in the sink, for the cool porcelain

was tender,

and took out the tattered and cut each stem

on a slant,

trimmed the black and raggy leaves, and set them all –

roses, delphiniums, daisies, iris, lilies,

and more whose names I don’t know, in bright new water-

gave them

 

a bounce upward at the end to let them take

their own choice of position, the wheels, the spurs,

the little sheds of the buds. It took, to do this,

perhaps fifteen minutes.

Fifteen minutes of music

with nothing playing.

That Heals Fish

This is a poem that heals fish – how is it relevant to occupational therapy? How is it relevant to you? 1) boredom can lead to good things if you let it, 2) you can’t look in one place all the time and expect to find the full answer 3) meaning is what is “meaningful” and “meaningful” is found by looking? risking? doing? seeking? waiting? drawing? writing?…[no one else can really tell you this], 4) silence is important, 5)      , 6)      , 7)      …

(This post to always be blended with April 25th’s!)

A Reminder

I like the list that follows (from a Berkley therapist). But I don’t believe it happens in a vacuum. Let your emotional work be there, under what you chose to do with your hands.

Do things each day; Occupy yourself with small things that matter, that advance you, that please you, whether they ‘work’ or ‘fail’ in the moment. They might be momentous accomplishments. Or they may be ‘small’ things. You decide: whittle wood, accept a job, feed the fish, cook supper, read a book, go eat the ice cream at the new library, throw a softball with your family….

And in the background be quietly aware of letting the following happen:

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Meaning, Purpose, Story

I was reminded of this at the Dr. Ruth Lanius conference in recent past days. Strength-based, she kept reminding clinicians to listen to their clients’ experience and self-knowledge.  The digital story-telling was just a comment, but I was reminded of having heard of it before – something that can ground us in our creativity while feeling the power of our voice. Our stories matter; no matter how we tell them: