About Hakomi OT: Therapy and Consulting

Psychosocial Occupational Therapy and Hakomi Mindfulness-Based Somatic Psychotherapy (Body-focused therapy).

Breath-work

Last week I saw a video of a therapist reviewing and teaching a type of breath-work that involved a person pushing breath out strongly by pinching in their abdominal muscles. The instructions also involved acting as if one is blowing out a candle that is about arms length away. She suggested to re-seed one’s breath and reset an upset system by attempting to blow out this imaginary candle about 10 times, before your body may allow you to move into deeper, intentional breathing. It was a good video, but I should have noted its location (URL) at the time.

However, this simple list from “The Utopian Life” also appears to be quite good. If you have success with it, feel free to email me with what you notice. (I’m getting no payment for mentioning them. Check out their site if you wish).

 

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Real

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
― Marcel Proust, as quoted in “A General Theory of Love”

I’m attaching two links to Tara Brach’s page. The two short meditations I reference below are intended for those beginning mind-body practice, yet I suspect could be useful to anyone so inclined.

Structure and Routine

Structure is what allows a beautiful house to stand. Routine is  simply the structure of time. Structure is the base of design, creativity and life. Why do we often consider Structure and Routine lesser? Perhaps they are the spine of freedom. Thanks to conversations that give me a pause. Using some discipline ensures we have time for the important people and projects. Knowing when to drop discipline is an art!

The Science of Hakomi

This is from an article that describes the basic work of a therapist and a client engaged in the Hakomi approach to psychotherapy. Interestingly, occupational therapy is also about seeking full personhood through experiencing ‘fit’ between one’s environment, one’s jobs and duties and one’s skills and attitudes (one’s self). People want to know they are whole. In discovering how to best create a good fit, the experience-in-the-body approach of Hakomi are a unique guide.

The basic work of health professionals in general and psychotherapists in particular is to become full human beings and to inspire full human beingness in other people who feel starved about their lives. —Chogyam Trungpa, Full Human Beingness (3)

http://vancouverhakomi.ca/writings/writings-by-ron-kurtz/the-science-of-hakomi/